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Headway Salisbury and South Wiltshire has launched two new services for adults with acquired brain injuries

Headway Salisbury and South Wiltshire has launched two new services for adults with acquired brain injuries

Headway Salisbury and South Wiltshire, a local charity working across Wiltshire, has launched two new services for adults with acquired brain injuries. Acquired Brain Injuries can occur for a variety of reasons such as road traffic incidents, falls, assaults, strokes, viral infections, brain tumours, and injuries due to lack of oxygen.

Headway Salisbury and South Wiltshire has developed a new Activities Group to run two days a week, on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9.30am to 1.30pm at Salisbury medical Practice, Fisherton House, Salisbury. The group will work with individuals to achieve rehabilitation goals through a variety of activities such as art, music, exercise and group discussions. If you are interested in coming along please contact Headway Salisbury on 07725 827869 or info@salisburyheadway.co.uk

Headway Salisbury and South Wiltshire have also appointed an Employment Advisor (Wendy Moscrop) who will work with individuals hoping to return to paid or voluntary employment. Wendy will be working with individuals to improve areas such as communication skills, self-confidence and manual dexterity as well as more traditional areas such as CV development and interview skills. Wendy is keen to work with local employers to enable individuals to gain work experience – anyone interested in supporting this initiative please contact us via www.headwaysalisbury.co.uk or info@salisburyheadway.co.uk

The impact of acquired brain injury is often sudden and devastating and the effects can be physical, emotional and cognitive; it can shatter families and leave survivors in desperate need of support. It can last a lifetime and change every aspect of an individual. As an often ‘unseen’ and misdiagnosed condition, brain injury survivors and their families are often isolated and this can lead to depression, mental health problems, individuals becoming dependent on drugs and alcohol, breakdown of family relationships and loss of employment. Relationships can be placed under extreme strain due to physical, emotional, cognitive and financial consequences of the injury.

The effects of acquired brain injury are lifelong and patients and their families require continued care and support, often for the rest of their lives. Research shows that early, consistent, continued support (even after a mild head injury) can minimise long term impacts. Rehabilitation also helps the survivor and their family cope more successfully with any remaining disabilities.


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